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Mets Season in Review: Curtis Granderson

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Oct 28, 2016; Chicago, IL, USA; New York Mets player Curtis Granderson smiles during a press conference awarding Granderson the Roberto Clemente Award before game three of the 2016 World Series at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Dennis Wierzbicki-USA TODAY Sports
Oct 28, 2016; Chicago, IL, USA; New York Mets player Curtis Granderson smiles during a press conference awarding Granderson the Roberto Clemente Award before game three of the 2016 World Series at Wrigley Field. Mandatory Credit: Dennis Wierzbicki-USA TODAY Sports
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How he did in 2016

In 2016, Granderson saw some of his numbers take a dip.

His batting average dropped 22 points after a slow start that saw him hit .213 through the first two months. In 27 games played during the month of May, his on-base percentage was just .268.

However, Granderson turned things around a bit during the early summer months and wound up ending the year on a high note. In his last 27 games of the season, Granderson hit .302 with eight homers and 21 RBI while slugging .615.

What’s really shown up though in Granderson’s stint with the Mets is his speed decline. It’s to the point now where Granderson has not become a threat at all to steal bases.

From 2007-11, Granderson turned in three seasons of 20-plus steals. Last year in 150 games, Granderson only had six stolen base attempts (four successful). With 2015 being the outlier, Granderson’s stolen base tries have declined steadily since 2011.

Sometimes, the best ability is availability and Granderson has exemplified that. In three years with the Mets, he’s only missed 24 games. Half of those games came last season. He still keeps himself in great shape as he turns 36 next March. Plus, his power is still there as evidenced by his fourth season of at least 30 home runs last year.

Granderson enters 2017 needing just seven homers to reach the 300-mark for his career.

The bottom line is Granderson still has value as a power threat near the top of the lineup. He doesn’t have the speed that he used to possess to be a true lead-off hitter anymore, but Granderson still fits well in the middle of the order.

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