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Mets will likely not keep Blevins as market has been set

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Apr 17, 2016; Cleveland, OH, USA; New York Mets relief pitcher Jerry Blevins (39) walks off the field during a pitching change in the ninth inning against the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field. Mandatory Credit: David Richard-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 17, 2016; Cleveland, OH, USA; New York Mets relief pitcher Jerry Blevins (39) walks off the field during a pitching change in the ninth inning against the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field. Mandatory Credit: David Richard-USA TODAY Sports
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With how offseason has played out, Jerry Blevins is more than likely out of the Mets’ current price range.

On Thursday morning, it was announced that the Colorado Rockies signed lefty reliever, Mike Dunn to a three-year, $18 million deal. If there was any hope that the New York Mets would re-visit trying to keep Jerry Blevins, that has most likely flown out the window based on how Dunn and other relievers like him are getting paid.

The market is now set for lefty relievers with this latest signing. Even though Dunn throws harder, Blevins turned in his best season from a strikeout ratio standpoint in his career (11.1 per nine innings). Blevins also allowed just one home run in 102 at-bats against lefty hitters during his 2016 campaign and his first full season as a Met.

His body of work coupled with the fact that he doesn’t light up the radar gun means that there will most likely be fewer concerns from any team offering a three-year contract. Blevins turned 33 back in September, but lefties usually have a more career longevity.

The Mets are still trying to clear payroll first before going after anybody. With taking Curtis Granderson off the market and the continuing struggle to deal Jay Bruce, the Mets’ off-season plans are stuck in neutral. At the moment, the Mets are waiting for the first shoe to drop before moving on to the next phase. By that time, the market for relief help may be dry.

Blevins has been a solid fit in the Mets’ bullpen and there’s a definite lack of experience cast into his role should he sign somewhere else. This chain of events is only confirming what we already knew: the market for Blevins was going to be set too high for the Mets without moving other money first. The latter isn’t really close to happening after mild interest from other teams has fizzled out.

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At this point Mets fans may be resigned to the notion that the status quo will be maintained for the most part going into 2017.

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