New York Mets News

Mets arbitration-eligibles: who should stay and who should go?

By Danny Abriano
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The Mets have nine players who are eligible for salary arbitration. Who should the Mets offer arbitration to and who should the non-tenders be?

Buddy Carlyle, RHP:

Carlyle, who will be 37 next season, came from nowhere to post a 1.45 ERA and 0.90 WHIP in 31 innings pitched for the Mets in 2014. It was his first successful big league stint since 2008. Carlyle isn’t likely to replicate his production from 2014, but the salary he’ll receive through arbitration will likely be below $1 million.

Verdict: offer arbitration

Lucas Duda, 1B:

Duda came into his own in 2014, clubbing 30 home runs. He’s the starting first baseman, and offering him arbitration is a foregone conclusion.

Verdict: offer arbitration

Dana Eveland, LHP

Eveland was solid for the Mets in 2014, but also dealt with a few nagging injuries – including an elbow injury that ended his season a few weeks early. However, his relatively young age, left-handedness, and low salary will likely result in the Mets keeping him around.

Verdict: offer arbitration

Dillon Gee, RHP

Gee is an interesting case. His remarkable stretch of efficiency that bridged 2013 and early-2014 was due to come to an end – and did – as his peripherals simply didn’t match his production. In 2014, Gee put up an ERA of 4.00 (his FIP was 4.52), while posting the lowest K/9 rate, highest BB/9 rate, and highest HR/9 rate of his career. Likely slated to earn roughly $5 million in 2015 and with the Mets loaded with starting pitching, it isn’t crazy to think that Gee could be non-tendered. However, the wise move would be to tender Gee a contract and then look to trade him.

Verdict: offer arbitration

Jenrry Mejia, RHP

Mejia is young, productive, late-inning tested, and still relatively inexpensive. He may not be the closer in 2015, but he’ll certainly be part of the back-end of the bullpen committee.

Verdict: offer arbitration

Daniel Murphy, 2B

The Mets may look to trade Murphy, who is expected to earn roughly $8 million through arbitration and who is set to hit free agency after 2015. However, there’s no way he’ll be non-tendered. The Mets have two options. They can tender him a contract and trade him before or during the season, or they can sign him to an extension.

Verdict: offer arbitration

Bobby Parnell

Parnell is coming off Tommy John surgery that wiped out nearly his entire 2014 campaign. Since Parnell spent all but one game on the disabled list, his salary (which was $3.7 million last season) will likely remain stagnant. It wouldn’t be stunning if the Mets non-tendered Parnell and tried to re-sign him for less, but that would be a gamble.

Verdict: offer arbitration

Ruben Tejada, SS

According to reports, the Mets will either use Wilmer Flores or an external option as their starting shortstop in 2015. That means that Tejada, if he remains a Met, will be a bench player. Tejada will probably earn a shade under $2 million through arbitration, and it doesn’t seem prudent to allocate that type of money to a backup who really doesn’t provide any versatility.

Verdict: non-tender

Eric Young, Jr., OF

Simply put, the Eric Young, Jr. experiment (he hit .229/.299/.311 this past season) has run its course. Young, Jr. will not be a starting outfielder with the Mets (nor should he), and his salary is about to reach the point (roughly $2.5 million) where carrying him as a fourth outfielder makes very little sense. Add to that the fact that the Mets have both Matt den Dekker and Kirk Nieuwenhuis who can slide into EYJ’s role and you get an easy decision.

Verdict: non-tender

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