New York Mets News

Daniel Murphy to left field would be hysterical on many levels

By Danny Abriano
Jul 22, 2014; Seattle, WA, USA; New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy (28) hits a single against the Seattle Mariners during the fifth inning at Safeco Field. Mandatory Credit: Steven Bisig-USA TODAY Sports
Jul 22, 2014; Seattle, WA, USA; New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy (28) hits a single against the Seattle Mariners during the fifth inning at Safeco Field. Mandatory Credit: Steven Bisig-USA TODAY Sports /
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After the final game of the season on Sunday, it was reported that the Mets had briefly broached the idea of Daniel Murphy moving to left field. Murphy reportedly balked, killing the idea before it had a chance to become something more.

However, it was reported on Monday that Murphy would be amenable to moving positions (without that new position specified) for the good of the team.

Fortunately for Murphy, the Mets, and fans, the odds that Murphy plays left field for the Mets in 2015 appear to be close to nil.

Still, it’s disconcerting that the idea was even brought up.

Here are three reasons why Murphy to left field would be a terrible idea:

  • For all of his shortcomings at second base, the left field version of Daniel Murphy – which existed and failed mightily several seasons ago – makes the second base version of Murphy look like a gold glover. By moving Murphy to left, the Mets would be weakening themselves defensively by an amount that’s almost unfathomable. That’s to say nothing about the fact that…
  • Murphy’s offensive game is not something that translates to the outfield. He’s a spray hitter who is most valuable at second base and may be passable at third base. In the outfield, he’d be one of the worst every day players in the league. Over his career, Murphy has averaged 10 home runs per year. That doesn’t play in the outfield unless you’re exceptional defensively and/or make up for your lack of power with an abundance of speed on the bases. Murphy possesses neither quality.
  • Moving Murphy to left field would mean that the Mets not only failed to upgrade their biggest position of need, but that they’ve downgraded it substantially. It’s something the team simply should not even begin to consider.

Due to the above, don’t expect Daniel Murphy anywhere near left field in 2015.

As is noted above, though, the fact that it was even brought up is mind boggling.

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