Aug 14, 2013; Los Angeles, CA, USA; New York Mets first baseman Ike Davis (29) enters the dugout after scoring a run in the second inning of the game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY Sports

Ike Davis’ Dad with Harsh Words for Mets


Ike Davis‘ father Ron, himself a former big leaguer, had some harsh words for the Mets today.

The elder Davis was in attendance at the Baseball Assistance Team charity event in Manhattan, and didn’t hold back when he was asked about the trade rumors that have surrounded his son this offseason.  He also spouted off about other issues he has…

Ron Davis is angry with the Mets:

I think that’s why the Mets have really screwed up in that situation — because they’ve publicly done it so much, it’s saying to my son, ‘Hey, we don’t want you anymore.’  So I think they backed themselves into a corner saying, ‘We want to trade you, but we want ‘X’ amount.’ Now, with Milwaukee getting [Mark] Reynolds and [Lyle] Overbay and this guy, now they’re backing themselves into a corner. They’re in a situation like, ‘Well, heck, we may have to keep him now.’ If you would have done it quietly and said, ‘Hey, well people called us, we didn’t call them,’ then you could have something to say. But when you’ve gone out publicly and said, ‘Hey, we don’t want you here anymore’ basically, he’s learned the game.

Ron Davis is angry with the media:

The media was just messed up.  When you’re hitting .162, and you make an error, it’s like, ‘Oh, he’s crappy.’ Now, if you’re hitting. 262 or .302, it’s, ‘Oh, he made an error. Aw, shoot, that was a tough hop.’ … It’s how you’re hitting. You don’t find a guy who is the Gold Glove hitting .162. You find the guy who’s hitting .362 and doesn’t catch very well.

Ron Davis isn’t aware that the fences have been moved in at Citi Field:

The ballpark needs a fresh start.  You take Fred Lynn. If he would have stayed in Fenway, he probably would have been a Hall of Famer…and now he went to Anaheim and what happened? They were pop-ups. Outs.  So the bottom line is: Right field [at Citi Field], the wind coming out of that tunnel, and being so far, that’s a bad ballpark for a left-handed hitter. So you take him to Colorado or Baltimore or Milwaukee or Texas, those ballparks are home-run hitters’ ballparks. I didn’t realize until I got out of the game and until Ike started playing that the ballpark can make you an All-Star or a Hall of Famer.

Thoughts:

It’s understandable that the father of an athlete whose name was bandied about in trade rumors all offseason would be a little upset.  However, Ron Davis, as a former major leaguer who knows baseball is a business, should’ve known better than to have shot off at the mouth the way he did today.

The Mets made Ike Davis a first round draft pick, guided him through the minors, promoted him to the majors when he was 23 years old, and pay him millions of dollars to play a children’s game.

To hear Ron Davis say it, though, Ike Davis is the only player whose potential trade has ever been discussed in public, is a victim who shouldn’t be held accountable, and has been wronged.

Aside from bashing the fact that the Mets discussed his son in public, the elder Davis also had harsh words for the media (who I suppose caused his son to struggle at the plate in 2012 and 2013).

The elder Davis droned on about how the Mets didn’t value his son.  If that was the case, they would’ve traded him or non-tendered him.

To top off his ill-timed and unfortunate comments, Ron Davis had harsh words for Citi Field, apparently not realizing that the deep fences he spoke of were moved in three seasons ago.

Earlier in the offseason, Ike Davis was asked about the rumors and the offseason, and he responded by saying all the right things.  It’s a shame his father couldn’t do the same.

 

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Tags: Featured Ike Davis New York Mets Popular Ron Davis

  • Clyde Spillenger

    Well, it’s hard to think ill of a man for defending his son.